Changing clocks can be a problem

person by Trude Meland, Norwegian Petroleum Museum
Many people are unable to handle the transition from winter to summer time. The same has applied to the control system on the Draugen platform.
— Draugen control room. Photo: Shadé Barka Martins/Norwegian Petroleum Museum
© Norsk Oljemuseum

When the clocks were being advanced by an hour early on Sunday 25 March 2012, the alarm activated, production shut down and personnel on board had to muster to the lifeboats.

The automatic shutdown was caused by computer problems in connection with the transition to summer time. But mustering to the lifeboats was routine – the crew were never in any danger. Production was restored during the course of the day.[REMOVE]Fotnote: Tidens Krav, 27 March 2012, “Draugen stanset av sommertid”.

Norway adopted summer time for the first time in 1916, and then in 1943-45 and 1959-65. Reintroduced in 1980, it has run since 1996 from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday of October.

Originally adopted to save electricity consumption, it is now intended to maximise the amount of daylight available to people.

Published August 8, 2018   •   Updated October 3, 2018
© Norsk Oljemuseum
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